Anatomy of a Project: Houses

In the fall, I committed to trying out doing projects more with the kids and we tried a few things had one real success. With all out outside commitments, we have had to dial back and simplify and drop all the “extras” projects (we’re still doing some math and writing projects), but I wanted to back up and blog about our resources and the way this tiny germ spread down rabbit trails.

We started with a board of project ideas and “houses and architecture” was one of them. After some discussion, we picked it as one of the things we wanted to try out so I started gathering resources to try with the kids.

The first thing I pulled out, which I had been hoping to try, was the book A Blueprint for Geometry about designing your own house and learning about geometry at the same time. I was excited by that, though the kids were less so. However, as I started trying to organize it, I also got less excited. The book, frankly, was terrible. We loved the ideas about math and playground design in Designing Playgrounds from the same series, but this one, by a different author, was just not enough information or structure. With the kids not at all keen to do it, we dumped it. I asked if they wanted to build model houses or design a house and they weren’t interested. It turned into a dead end.

Next up, I brought home a pile of library books and the first one we studied was Housebuilding for Children. This delightful book from the 70’s (and I mean, so from the 70’s) is like a free range parent’s dream with several plans for tiny play houses for kids to build themselves. We got the materials to make the balloon frame house and dove in. It was really hard. I think the type of wood we got splintered too easily. Some of the materials in the book weren’t available. But in the end, the kids, mostly on their own, build the frame of the house! For real. Then cold weather hit and we didn’t finish it. It’s so small that I’m not sure if they will finish it or not (we may try to donate it to a friend). But it was really a rewarding part of the project. It took a lot of perseverance to do all that hammering and building.

housebuilding

I took out a bunch of books about buildings and architecture. I started with David Macauley’s Unbuilding, in which he imagines the Empire State Building being taken apart. This turned out to be really disturbing as a concept so we didn’t finish the book. Not only that, but the kids both agreed that they weren’t as interested in big famous buildings like the Pyramids and the Empire State Building. Instead, they wanted to focus on houses. We talked about the House and Home exhibit at the National Building Museum, which we have visited several times, and began to think together about some elements of that, such as different styles of homes and different needs people have for their homes.

I returned the buildings books and got a second pile of books about houses. See Through History: Houses and Homes was the first resource along with some other books about the history of different houses and simple picture books with images of houses around the world. I read some aloud and the kids read others on their own and wrote narrations about the different kinds of houses through time. Next, I found what is probably one of the greatest books I’ve found for a topic, Old House, New House by Michael Gaughenbaugh. This was an incredibly detailed picture book published by the National Historic Trust. I mentioned it in our book round up a few months ago. It covered American architecture styles from colonial to the present and everything in between with great drawings and a really well-done frame of a story about a boy whose family is restoring an old Victorian. The kids were really riveted by the book.

That led us in a few directions. I looked for other books about homes and architecture. We got I Know That Building, which turned out to be a really cute book with some cool activities, but aimed toward slightly younger kids. I also bought the Dover Coloring Book called The American House on a whim. That was much more useful. The kids and I all enjoyed coloring several pages in it and talking about the colors and designs of the homes. Finally, one more book in our library pile, The House I Live In: At Home in America, had a cool set of narratives of kids talking about their homes all over the country. The kids read the book and wrote their own pieces about our house.

That led us to think about our neighborhood and home. We investigated our own century-old house and did some activities to think about the details. We drew the house and did some art activities. Then we played around with old online maps of the city. We found our block going back as far as we could until we couldn’t find our block anymore on the oldest set of maps. It didn’t exist! Then we went to the special local research library and found the “birth certificate” for our house and had it printed up, as well as the name of the original owner. Back home, the kids learned to use the online newspaper archives to look up our address and the original owner. We didn’t find too much, but we did learn that the original owner had been German and later became a middle school principal. It was really exciting for the kids to make their own discoveries as they searched and zoomed in on the old newspaper pages from nearly a century ago.

Meanwhile, I took out a pile of books about various architects. Most of them ended up unread, but BalletBoy read one about Frank Gehry and loved it (and asked to go to Spain… hm…). We also watched a documentary about Frank Lloyd Wright and I promised the kids a trip to Falling Water that still needs to be delivered. I took out a number of books with activities about Frank Lloyd Wright as well as other architects, such as a book about Greene and Greene. However, none of the activities really resonated with the kids, so we didn’t do much of them.

When winter arrived, the project sort of naturally petered out. However, it was really neat to have this focus on a “big” topic for a solid couple of months. The project brought in some math, a lot of research skills, some hands on skills, a lot of teamwork, some reading, some writing, a surprising amount of history, and some art. The kids had to bear with me as I took us on some detours and assigned things like writing and reading to go with this project and I had to follow them and shut down some of my visions for what the project could be and follow the things they were interested in.

Overall, it was a good experience. While we’re taking a hiatus from doing another big, all-encompassing project like this, I’m excited to try another one in the future.

3 thoughts on “Anatomy of a Project: Houses

  1. Hi Farrar,
    You might also like “Why we live where we live” by Kira Vermond, published by Owlkids Books (which also publishes Owl and Chickadee magazines). It’s an interesting book about the development of communities and is quite well done.

  2. Sounds great! If you’re interested in Frank Lloyd Wright, the Pope Leighey house down by us is worth a trip. It was built in Arlington and moved down to Woodlawn. It’s small and has many interesting details to manage light and air and comfortable living (like a kitchen window that opens to an elevated herb planter, so the cook can reach out and snip).

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