Tag Archives: eighth grade

Eighth Grade

Box Day set up. We still like it to be exciting. Yes, I got letter cookies.

I updated the “Our Curriculum” post in the menu to include what we did for seventh grade. I can’t really do those these days until I’ve finished the year. Gone are the days when I ordered and planned for the whole year!

These days, I plan for a few months out. Still, I’ll put this post up on the menu as eighth grade, but until the end of the year, it’s a lie. Well, it’s a hope and a dream and a potential path. We’ll see where the wind carries us in the end.

Mushroom

Mushroom has been really good at finishing big projects and being self-directed about them. As such, I’ve kept things a bit open for him. He needs to work on reading, but we’re getting there.

Math:
Jacobs’s Elementary Algebra
We’ll see what extras we work in, like some more Mathematics: A Human Endeavor.

English and Language Arts:
Twisting Arms: Persuasive Writing (We’ve just started this virtually unknown program, but I love it!)
Daily Paragraph Editing
Some Brave Writer things like freewriting and poetry teas
Monthly short stories
Literature List:
Animal Farm by George Orwell
March by John Lewis
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanan
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Projects and Studies

Astronomy
For this project, he’s reading Dava Sobel’s The Planets, as well as several shorter books and documentaries. We have Seeing the Sky for experiments as well as local astronomy clubs. We will also be using Crash Course: Astronomy.

Graphic Design
For this project, we’re using Picture This by Molly Bang and Creative Workshop by David Sherwin for hands on projects and thinking, and a number of more technical books for learning software skills. This will also incorporate some history and art history as well as research projects and a paper.

There will definitely be more… but I don’t know what yet!

BalletBoy

BalletBoy is an incredibly diligent worker, but I wanted to challenge him a little more. That’s been hard for me (it was my goal last year and I don’t feel I entirely met it!). To help us, I got more structured programs and plans for him this year to see if that does the job. I especially want him to focus on answering questions in his writing.

Math:
Algebra: Structure and Method by Dolciani, et al.

English and Language Arts:
Brave Writer elements like freewriting, poetry teas, and dictation
Daily Paragraph Editing (occasionally)
Monthly Short Stories
Literature List, with literature guides from a variety of sources, including the Glencoe Lit Library:
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
March by John Lewis

Spanish:
He’ll continue with Duolingo, but this isn’t totally settled yet. I’m trying to work out a tutor or an online option for him that will work and the pieces haven’t quite come together yet.

Projects and Studies:

The 50’s:
We’re using Prufrock Press’s Exploring America series for this. It’s incredibly rich in primary sources of all kinds.

Chemistry:
He’s using a huge number of resources for this topic, including TOPS Analysis, TOPS Solutions, Chemistry Experiments for Children, and some fun kits like a soap making kit and a cheese making kit. He’s reading The Disappearing Spoon, and using a simple chemistry coloring book as well.

Dance Anatomy:
This project will happen in the spring, so it’s not totally settled, but we’re going to use an anatomy coloring book, a couple of books about the human body, and the book Dance Anatomy by Jacqui Greene Haas, which came recommended and includes exercises and technical information together.

Paper

A few years ago, I started making a packet of paper for the kids that included things for the year. I bind them at Staples and have them ready to start the year on Box Day. They include things like a plan for what they’re studying, lists of required reading books, literature guides for novels, assignments I’ve created for projects, and a copy of each of the short stories that we’ll read. We read one per month and discuss it at a poetry tea. I put a pretty cover on them to make them personalized and exciting.

The eighth grade packets may have exploded slightly.

I put in more paper than ever. I’m hoping to have the kids do an “eighth grade internship” before the end of the year, so I made an assignment page for that. In fact, I made assignment sheets for more things than normal overall. The short stories seem to have been a bit longer, as were some of the lit guides I decided to use.

One child’s packet went a little crazy. It’s more than twice as long as the other’s. I think this may be a reflection of how much I’m trying to get him to do some polished work. If only I throw more paper at him, surely something will emerge from that? Right?

So while Mushroom’s packet has these general outlines of all the various subjects he wanted to tackle, with little notes that he should choose three projects or write a paper that we’d later agree upon, BalletBoy’s packet is filled with specific reading questions and long checklists. Mushroom is a finisher and he dreams big. He does a good job on anything he really sets out to do so giving him room to just do his thing makes sense. BalletBoy goes in fits and starts lately. He has lots of first drafts that never quite get finished or polished. He dashes off three word answers to what should be essay questions. He meanders through research on his own rabbit trails and never quite arrives at a finished product.

There are upsides and downsides to each of these approaches, of course. Mushroom can get anxious about his projects because he has a streak of perfectionism. BalletBoy can get lots of experience as he goes and he really appreciates the journey. I especially see this with ballet, where his studio focuses on technique above flashy end performance. Still, my goal for the year is to get him finishing more things and showing off more products worth showing off. Thus, the larger paper trail.

Here’s hoping that this isn’t a completely failing strategy.