Tag Archives: high school

High School Planning

IMG_5152

I’ve said it before here and I’ll say it again, but I really find that our years tend to be a little bit Reggio Emilia most of the time. That is, the curriculum gets written in a backwards way. Rather than writing it up at the start, I don’t know what we’ll do until it’s done. That’s why I only updated the 8th grade section on my curriculum posts recently. I didn’t know what it would be until it was done.

For next year, it may turn out to be different. I guess we’ll see. However, with a “real” co-op – the sort with long term classes that you sign up for – and online courses and a need to track high school credits, we might finally have a year that is more or less what we planned at the start. I’m not sure, but I guess we’ll see.

Reading about science education, I became a fan of the “physics first” approach, so we’re giving that a shot by starting with an online physics course and adding in a high school level physics kit and some extra math.

For math, it’s time for geometry, so we’re continuing with Jacob’s. The algebra program worked very well for both my kids. BalletBoy made the switch mid-year from Dolciani, which had become so muddled and difficult for both of us by that point. I’m excited to have one final year of teaching math before I really exhaust my abilities to stay ahead of the kids and need to hand them off to another teacher for algebra II.

For history and English, Jill Harper from over at Simplify and I are cooking up a whole 9th grade curriculum. It’s going to be non-Western history focused, with different units looking at Africa and Asia. I’m currently furiously reading and re-reading African and Asian literature and getting excited about this. My kids will be the guinea pigs and we’re hoping to have the program available before the spring, so keep your eyes peeled for that.

After a lot of hard thinking, we’re going to delay doing Spanish. I know the traditional wisdom is to knock out those foreign language credits early, but I’m just not on board with the price tag and have decided to hold out for when they can dual enroll and be successful with that, just because it will be so much cheaper.

With the co-op and online classes my kids are taking, they’ll have some interesting electives. BalletBoy will end up with “Urban Architecture” or something along those lines. Mushroom will have coding. Overall, I’m excited for them and starting to get excited for the school year.

In It for the Long Haul

We’re cleaning off the shelves as part of our break, filing work away and updating portfolios. I told Mushroom and BalletBoy that if they wanted to consider high school, that this was it; they needed to speak up now.

It’s never really been entirely up to them. I wouldn’t have allowed them to go to middle school barring a very good reason. And I’ve been pretty sure we were going to go all the way through for awhile. However, they’re about to be teenagers. I think they should have more of a say at this point.

It’s not that high school would be impossible down the road if our circumstances changed. I know that in some states, once you start down one path for high school, it’s almost impossible to switch, but in the District, there are flexible options for high school credits. However, once the deadlines for applications to charter and selective public school programs have passed in the winter, a lot of doors will close. If we were going to even consider that, I explained, I needed time to get things in order, let them tour schools and research options, and create applications. This is eighth grade, I said. Tell me now.

BalletBoy, no surprise, answered immediately. No way. He wants to homeschool. It’s an easy answer when you know it’s enabling your passion. His ballet moves to six classes this year. I can’t imagine managing that plus school, much less more classes and high school.

Mushroom dithered. Would missing out on high school close off any job options or college options down the line, he wanted to know. That’s my long term thinker. I reassured him. No, absolutely not. I couldn’t promise that he absolutely would never run into a hassle because he was homeschooled, but it is pretty unlikely overall.

The thing is, I am almost positive at this point that I can give them a better, richer experience for high school than school can. I used to teach high school and I’ve never found it as intimidating as some people seem to. I know many people get nervous about high school, but right now, I’m in the midst of planning our eighth grade year and looking ahead to future possibilities and I’m not nervous, I’m excited. Neither of my kids are ever going to be the sort of kids who pull in high test scores and piles of AP exams and honor roll awards. They would just be mediocre in school. Mediocre and worn out by the long days and heavy amount of busy work. But at home, we can do targeted work and make time for passion projects and intense extracurriculars where they really do get to show their best selves.

Mushroom has a real interest in design and I tried to explain how excited I am to push him to do certain programs and internships in high school, how he can really pick and choose the sort of university he wants to attend. How doing high school at home won’t hold him back from that. In fact, the opposite, it might enable it.

“I don’t really want to go to school,” he admitted. “Then don’t!” I said. So we’re decided for sure.

Whew. And with that off my plate, now to focus on being in the moment and getting the most out of the end of middle school. After vacation, that is.